Bird Songs, Medical Therapy and Bird Brains

My dad always said we kids were a bunch of bird brains. I never knew exactly what he meant until now.

A news article by Natural News reveals that children who listen to recordings of bird songs behave more calmly when receiving medical treatment, according to those behind a new project at the Alder Hey Hospital in Liverpool, England.

Recordings of birdsong, rain and wind — made by hospital children along with sound recording artist Chris Watson in Springfield Park — are now being played throughout the children’s ward to calm patients during injections, surgery and other stressful procedures. The birds singing include blackbirds, greenfinches, robins and songthrushes.

“We have seen tangible benefits for patients in bringing the natural world into hospitals,” said Laura Sillers, Artistic Program Director of the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology. “We also installed it in the corridors and there have been numerous requests for the Bird Song chorus to be reproduced on CD which patients then play at home. This research will be groundbreaking in demonstrating the role art can play in delivering health benefits.”

Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson attributes humans’ love of birdsong to our intrinsic “biophilia,” or an inborn need to connect with nature and other living beings, according to Natural News.

Even Genesis expresses soulish kinship of birds and homo sapiens. Hence, the justification for the paternal quip “bird brain.”

More startling is the wisdom saying of nearby college history professor: “May the bird of paradise fly up your nose.” To the uninitiated, the professor was saying may God’s spirit get into your brain. By implication, it meant God’s will is for us to be spirit filled bird brains. Connecting the divine authored songs of birds with the presence of the divine would naturally engender peace and tranquility.

To read the entire article, go to the Natural News website.

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